Author Interview: Amanda Porter

AmandaPorterA.G. Porter is the author of The Darkness Trilogy, a YA Paranormal Thriller, and Pieces of My Heart, a book of poetry. She is currently writing a spin-off of her Darkness Trilogy characters, as well as her next poetry book. When she isn’t writing, she’s either busy being the coolest librarian on the planet or spending much needed time with her family. Ms. Porter lives in New Hope, Alabama with her husband, Billy, stepson, Brenton, and their 4 dogs.


1TheShadowThe Shadow Rayna Stone is an eighteen-year-old girl from a small Alabama town that just wants to save a little money for college. A summer job at an upscale resort surrounded by snobby, rich folks isn’t her idea of fun—until she meets eyes with the owner’s son, Liam and things begin to look brighter. But then she starts seeing things that she can’t explain and having dreams that are haunted by a being she calls The Shadow. The Shadow shows her things about some missing girls that she wished she had never seen and her dreams seem to be coming true. As if that isn’t enough, she learns that her ability gives her an insight into the feelings of others around her. When Rayna learns that Liam does feel something for her, she wants to tell him she feels the same, but something is warning her to stay away. Not because he is dangerous, but because she is.
2TheForsakenThe Forsaken Six months ago, Rayna Stone came face-to-face with a demented serial killer and survived, but not unscathed. Everyone knows that she is the “girl who almost died.” She’d rather hide, but she tries to live her life, go to school, get a job, and try not to let her Gift overwhelm her. Her nightmares have changed, but they’re still trying to show her something. All she can see are The Eyes and they must be watching her for a reason. Ron is still out there and The Shadow still haunts her dreams. Her Gift is getting stronger and she has obtained very powerful and more deadly abilities. While this might sound desirable, Rayna can’t help but think that means her Gift is preparing her for a war.
3TheRedeemedThe Redeemed Nightmares. The oncoming war. More Gifted emerge and not all of them are on her side. Secrets about her father are revealed. Who are The Children of The Light? Will Rayna be able to resist the powers of The Shadow with Jayce’s help? She had planned to face down her demons with Liam by her side, but now that he’s lost his soul, is he really lost to her forever?
Question after question, obstacle after obstacle present themselves in the last installment of The Darkness Trilogy. It’s coming to an end—the battle, the war. The only question Rayna Stone wants answered is whether she and her friends make it out alive.


Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin KeyMy novel Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is an historical sword-and-science fantasy adventure. Click here to read an excerpt.
An invading Persian warrior becomes obsessed with Dodrazeb, a strange isolated kingdom that possesses incredible technology. Ancient Dodrazeb’s puzzling choice to hide from the world pulls him deeper into layers of mysteries as its sly princess does everything she can to expel the invaders. What are the Dodrazebbians so desperate to keep hidden?
Get your copy on Amazon.com! Available in both e-book and paperback.


Q. The Darkness Trilogy is a scary young adult paranormal thriller. Tell us about the story and its main characters.

It all starts with my main character, Rayna Stone, when she attends a summer internship at an upscale golf resort in Guntersville, AL. It’s there that her supernatural abilities awaken, putting her and her friends down a very dangerous path with a being known as The Shadow.

Q. Why are you drawn to frightening themes?

I think it stems from my love of the paranormal genre. I’ve always been drawn to it.

Q. Why did you choose to write in the YA genre?

Because I love it. Even when I finally made it into adulthood, I was still reading in that section.

Q. Do you find it more fun to write heroes or villains? Why?

I love my heroes, but villains are fun as well. I think villains are much more intriguing for an author because we are not and never will be, or at least I hope so, that horrific. Especially supernatural villains. They are able to do some very terrifying things and not care about the consequences.

Q. What’s different or unique about your story from other YA paranormal tales?

For one thing, my story takes place in Alabama and there really aren’t many southern YA paranormal thrillers. Rayna is also a Christian so she utilizes her faith to help her in her quest to defeat the bad guy.

Q. Readers often don’t realize that writers do lots of research, even for speculative and fantasy stories, before they complete a book. What kind of research did you do for this story?

I did a lot of research in the geography of Guntersville. It’s a real place! I spent a lot of time on the campgrounds as a child, but Guntersville is huge. I wanted to make sure I got the area I was talking about right. I also research myths and legends of different spiritual beings.

Q. Which works and authors would you say influenced the book? How?

Definitely R.L. Stine and Dean Koontz.

Q. What was your favorite scene to write?

Oh, wow. I’m not even sure. I really like writing a certain character’s scene. Jasmine is this snarky, sassy girl with zero filter. I want to be like her when I grow up so I definitely enjoyed writing any scene with her. Besides that, the epic fight scenes!

Q. What was the hardest part of the book for you to write?

The end of the trilogy! It was bittersweet.

Q. What inspired you to write this story with these characters?

I actually had the idea for this story beginning in the 9th grade. It evolved when I started to experience sleep paralysis. Look it up!

Q. Do you have plans for more books in this series? Other books possibly in a different genre?

I do. I’m writing a spinoff right now.

Q. What made you decide to get serious about writing? How long were you “dabbling” before you felt the time was right to publish your work?

I seriously think I just woke up one and told myself that if I ever wanted to finish a book I better start now. I wrote off and on again for years, but that bug bit really hard one day.

Q. A lot of writers seem to despise the editing process. Do you like it or hate it? How do you approach the task of editing?

I’m with the despisers. I hate doing it. I will read through my own works to see if I catch anything and just to make sure I didn’t go off the deep end somewhere, but I don’t edit my own writing.

Q. Why did you decide to self-publish?

I went round and round with Literary Agent. It didn’t work out, but I’m thankful for the experience. After that, I decided to go it alone. I have learned so much along the way. I would highly recommend a new author to reach out to other self-published authors so they avoid all the pitfalls. Network! Go to conventions and book festivals. I wish I knew someone when I started out!

Q. You seem to have a dream job for a writer—you are the manager of a branch library! Tell us how being a librarian has impacted your writing, and how your writing has influenced your career.

I think just being reminded on a daily basis that there are people out there who genuinely love a good story, a book, keeps me motivated.

Q. When you aren’t crafting amazing stories, what do you do for fun?

Sleeping. LOL! I spend a lot of time reading and just being with my family. I also volunteer a lot so I normally stay pretty busy. I have a little one on the way (yay!) so my schedule isn’t going to slow down anytime soon.

Q. What advice do you have for writers who want to become published authors?

Just write and write what you want to. It’s OK if the first book you write isn’t great. Write another one. It’s like anything else in life, the more you do it, the better you’re going to be. It’s that simple.

Q. Is there anything about the writing life that you think is misunderstood by the public?

The amount of time, money, and our souls we put into our craft. We don’t just sneeze out a book. It takes years for some of us and a lot of hard work.

Q. As a reader, what about a book turns you away?

Anything that’s over-the-top explicit just for shock value.

Q. What’s your all-time favorite book? Why?

This is an impossible question to answer! I can name a few series I’ve gone back to and read several times, but to pick one? I can’t. The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, Odd Thomas, and the list goes on. I like them all for many different reasons.

Q. What’s your all-time favorite TV show? Why?

There are so many! Doctor Who, Supernatural, The Walking Dead, GoT…

Q. What’s your all-time favorite movie? Why?

It’s probably Jurassic Park or Edward Scissorhands or Terminator 2 or Aliens or A Nightmare before Christmas or anything Disney…see, I can’t pick just one.

Q. Where is one place you’d like to visit that you haven’t been before? Why?

Ireland! I want to go on a castle tour.

Contact Information:

Author Name: A.G. Porter

Facebook: @TDTAGP (A.G. Porter, Author)

Twitter: @agporter1

Book Links: A.G. Porter’s books are available on Amazon.com

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Author Interview: Terry Maggert

Terry_Maggert_sq.jpg“Left-handed. Father of an apparent nudist. Husband to a half-Norwegian. Herder of cats and dogs. Lover of pie. I write books. I’ve had an unhealthy fascination with dragons since the age of— well, for a while. Native Floridian. Current Tennessean. Location subject to change based on insurrection, upheaval, or availability of coffee. Ten books and counting, with no end in sight. You’ve been warned.”
–Terry Maggert

A history professor with an awesome sense of humor and equally good taste in television viewing (he chose to start the first day of the semester by discussing the Targaryen succession), Terry’s novels explore dark fantasy, immortality, and the nature of love as we know it.


MaggertBooks


Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin KeyMy novel Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is an historical sword-and-science fantasy adventure. Click here to read an excerpt.
An invading Persian warrior becomes obsessed with Dodrazeb, a strange isolated kingdom that possesses incredible technology. Ancient Dodrazeb’s puzzling choice to hide from the world pulls him deeper into layers of mysteries as its sly princess does everything she can to expel the invaders. What are the Dodrazebbians so desperate to keep hidden?
Get your copy on Amazon.com! Available in both e-book and paperback.


Q. Dystopian sci-fi with dragons. Paranormal urban fantasy. Young adult fantasy. Time travel. Sword and sorcery. You are a most prolific writer. Tell us briefly—if that’s even possible—about your books. Do you have a favorite?

My favorite book is whichever one I’ve just finished. That gusty sigh you hear is me getting ready to crack my knuckles and start again, however—I have a favorite character. I love Tammy Cincotti, from the Halfway series. She makes me laugh out loud every single time I write a scene with her from the fingers guns to her hairdo to her unapologetic use of perfume. I love everything about her, right down to her weirdly intense loyalty and affinity for acid washed jeans. She’s a female version of me if I had a nuclear libido and still thought big hair was the only way to go.

Q. Do you have a new book or series in the works? How will it differ from your other novels?

I’ve got two series and five novels in the works, and they’re all over the place. One of them (out in Spring 2018) is quite a departure for me in the sense that it’s a male antihero who has a basis in truth. I read an incredibly sad story about hundreds of children being found in a grave behind an Irish orphanage, and something clicked in my head. As a father, the story made my stomach flip with rage and sadness, and I created a character who is the lone survivor of that orphanage. As he turns eighteen, he realizes that he isn’t crazy—he is hearing voices, but they’re the children who came before him in that sad, lonely place. I think it’s going to be visceral, sad, but oddly beautiful, too, because despite all of this, he’s going to survive.

Q. Do you find it more fun to write heroes or villains? Why?

VILLAINS. Oooooooo, they’re delicious to write. I lift my lip in a sneer, imagine myself glaring at someone while holding a glass of scotch, and write the most glorious insults. As a history professor, villains are everywhere—I just put them in front of my heroes, and the good news is their pride will always cause them to lose. Almost always, that is.

Q. Why did you choose to write science fiction and fantasy? What draws you to those stories?

I was a strange, dreamy kid who liked fishing, sports, and books. I was always off in my head, thinking about dragons or light speed spacecraft or long lost treasures. I think that the larger part of my brain never matured. If you ask my bride, she will confirm this.

Q. How do you write such amazing and strong female characters?

First: thank you! Second: write real people, and then make them women. That’s it. The details are things that real people experience, like Carlie’s short girl problems and morning hair, or Risa’s hatred of socks and sandals. I give them personalities based on who they are, not just what they are. Characters react, and denying that a female character may react differently is being dismissive of their reality. I’m proud of them, and can say that to me, they feel real.

Q. What’s different or unique about your stories?

I like to think that my readers feel like they’re in the moment with me. If Waleska is sad, so are you. If Aurelia kills someone who deserves it, you cheer. Their emotions are three dimensional and present. Also, waffles. We’re going to talk about waffles and pie. A lot.

Q. Readers may not realize that writers do lots of research, even for fantasy stories, before they complete a book. What kind of research do you do?

45 years of rabid reading. A relentless curiosity about everything except butter beans, which are of the devil and should be removed from the planet. A Master’s Degree in History. That’s the start. The rest is filled in by a passion for simple questions, like, “What would happen if a demon went to the beach? Do Vikings like jokes? What kind of dog would be friends with a ghost?” These are the simple seeds of stories that I love to write.

Q. Which works and authors would you say influence you the most? How?

Anne McCaffrey taught me to love dragons, and the unknown. Ernest Hemingway taught me that a simple sentence can make you cry for days. Robert Frost showed me that a poem can take me there. These are just a few, but the simple truth is that writers are the sum of their experiences, shaped by the voices that have made them feel something in their heart.

Q. What is your favorite type of scene to write?

Two people, in a room, being uncomfortably honest. Think of something that makes you feel like you’re intruding—that’s where I want the reader to be.

Q. What is the hardest portion of a novel for you to write?

THE MIDDLE OH PLEASE MAKE IT STOP. The middle. It’s just so far from the beginning that I’ve forgotten things like they hair color of characters. And their gender, sometimes. And why they hate each other. So, yeah. The middle.

Q. What made you decide to get serious about writing? How long were you “dabbling” before you felt the time was right to publish your work?

I was sitting up with my son (I took night shift when he was a toddler) and started writing a novel. I wrote 88,000 words with one hand while holding him, more or less. After the first sentence, I realized I had found my true voice. This is not to say it was perfect, but for the first time, it was me. I’m also responsible for some truly dreadful poetry, thus I write books now.

Q. A lot of writers seem to despise the editing process. Do you like it or hate it? How do you approach the task of editing?

I don’t mind, because I’m ashamed of the idiotic errors I make. It’s like the ability to take back dumb things you’ve said. Who wouldn’t love to do that? Okay—maybe I say more dumb things than the average person, but you get my point.

Q. Most of us authors don’t make enough money from writing – yet – to pay the bills. Do you have a job other than writing?

History Professor, but I treat my writing as a business. I have a written plan, goals, and hit them in my third year. Candidly, the first two years made me better, the third year taught me to write efficiently. In year four, I’ve come to the conclusion that I don’t just love writing; I need it. I’ve never been happier, and am an author coach as well. I love working with young writers who are talented but might need a bit of guidance.

Q. When you aren’t crafting amazing stories, what do you do for fun?

I eat, I bake, I run, I drink alarming amounts of coffee, and read. We have a lot of animals, so rescue is a big part of our lives. Our son is nine, and he’s the best thing on the planet, so the simple truth is that enjoying our family helps me get over the fact that my bride won’t let me have a giraffe. I’m not happy about this.

Q. What advice do you have for writers who want to become published authors?

1. Get a great cover. 2. Get a great cover. 3. After you get a great cover, get advice from someone you trust. I’m an author coach (mostly first time novelists) and our concern is always being professional and avoiding fraud.

Q. Is there anything about the writing life that you think is misunderstood by the public?

I don’t wear tweed. Ever. Oh, and writing from one to three in the morning while cats make biscuits on your head is hardly dignified, but it IS accurate.

Q. As a reader, what about a book turns you away?

When the author is more concerned about politics than a great story, I close the book and walk away. Every single time. If you’re not writing the best possible book, then I’m not devoting my time to it.

Q. What’s your all-time favorite book? Why?

The White Dragon, by Anne McCaffrey. It’s the distillation of her series “The Dragonriders of Pern” and I’ve had my copy for more than thirty years. It’s part fable, part sci-fi, and just perfect to me.

Q. What’s your all-time favorite TV show? Why?

Magnum, PI. Thomas Magnum was the picture of honor, and I value that. Also, he rocked Hawaiian shirts all the time, and I value that, too.

Q. What’s your all-time favorite movie? Why?

A strange film titled, “The Big Blue”. It’s about the sport of free-diving, and as a kid who grew up on the water, it’s a sort of love letter to the mystical quality of the ocean. Also, I love dolphins, so it’s almost a fantasy set in the modern era.

Q. Where is one place you’d like to visit that you haven’t been before? Why?

I travel a lot, but I must go to Africa because there’s a hotel where you can have breakfast with giraffes. I wasn’t kidding earlier; one of them is coming home in my carry-on. It’s going to happen.

Contact Information:

Author Name: Terry Maggert

Blog: http://terrymaggert.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/terrymaggertbooks/

Twitter: @TerryMaggert

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7226905.Terry_Maggert

Find Terry Maggert’s books on Amazon.com

Did In Search Of… Beget Expedition Unknown?

My tastes in entertainment have matured as TV’s efforts to sensationalize myths and tell titillating tales have evolved. Still, nothing prompts my imagination quite like ancient unsolved riddles, a big factor in my decision to write historical fantasy novels.

GPRWaWGHjRSMMbwIt’s fun to speculate that there are bizarre truths behind mysterious stories. From Sasquatch to ESP to UFOs, I’ve always been a fan of weird stuff. Give it a paranormal twist—throw in some vampires or poltergeists—and I’m riveted. Package it all as a quasi-documentary/semi-reality TV show with Leonard Nimoy as host, and you have one of my favorites from the 1970s. The incredibly popular In Search Of… presented speculation and conjecture as possible explanations for enduring mysteries such as the identify of Jack the Ripper or the truth about the lost continent of Atlantis.


Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin KeyTreasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is a historical sword-and-science fantasy adventure. A Persian warrior’s curiosity is ignited when he leads an invasion into Dodrazeb, a strange isolated kingdom that possesses incredible technology. Ancient Dodrazeb’s puzzling choice to hide from the world draws the warrior deeper into layers of mysteries as its princess does everything she can to expel the invaders. What are the Dodrazebbians so desperate to keep hidden? Get your copy on Amazon.com! Available in both e-book and paperback.


8066bf599bbddaa4481542b5d4effb8cIn Search Of… was informative, fun, and nerdy, providing some ambiguous answers and leaving the door open for other (more plausible) explanations. It was lightweight entertainment, but it turned me on to some real enduring mysteries: Stonehenge, the Great Pyramids, the Nazca Plains, the mystery of Roanoke Colony, the genius of Nikola Tesla, and so much more.

expedition-unknown-josh-gates-nazca-peru-005.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.725Today I am an avid fan of Josh Gates and his series Expedition Unknown. Gates, a scholar with an appetite for exotic food and amazing adventures, is a man-mountain of globe-trotting curiosity. He’s an archaeologist with an infectious enthusiasm for the bizarre who seeks the truth about ancient and historical mysteries. To get at the real story behind whatever myth or legend he’s investigating, Gates employs scientific research methods presented as heart-pounding adventures filmed around the world.

josh-gates-on-location-21.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.725Expedition Unknown has taken Gates to some of the most remote and dangerous locations on the planet. Indiana Jones would be impressed by his ability to access and explain never-before-seen artifacts while getting into some precarious circumstances. On each mission, Gates interacts with the people and shares impressions of the culture he’s visiting. He also indulges in the local cuisine, a segment that should come with a warning for the squeamish.

TEXU302H_Attila-the-hun_251287_912112.1457498.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.725Combining elements of travelogue with lessons in history and sociology, Gates takes the viewer on a journey of discovery filled with humor. Turn him loose in a tourist souvenir shop and he becomes a stand-up comedian. Put an obstacle in his path and he entertains viewers (and his camera crew) with groan-worthy one-liners.

Gates peels away the thin veneer of supposition, superstition, and sensationalism to reveal the solid truth at the core of legends and mysteries. Mostly, though, he makes history fun and accessible through investigating both familiar and little-known unsolved puzzles. What a marvelous way to exploit television’s ability to entertain and teach at the same time.

Sources

http://www.travelchannel.com/shows/expedition-unknown/articles/meet-josh-gates

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josh_Gates

https://www.facebook.com/joshgatesofficial/

http://www.therobotsvoice.com/2009/01/the_10_most_awesome_in_search_of_episodes.php

https://willmckinley.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/in-search-of-leonard-nimoys-1970s-reality-show/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Search_of…_(TV_series)